Publications by Type: Journal Article

2003
To the Internet, From the Internet: Comparative media coverage of transnational protests
Almeida, Paul D, and Mark Lichbach. 2003. “To the Internet, From the Internet: Comparative media coverage of transnational protests”. Mobilization: An International Quarterly 8 (3):249–272. Publisher's Version Abstract
We compare activist-based internet data with four other media sources—Lexis Nexis
Academic Universe, The Seattle Times, Global Newsbank, and The New York Times—on
their coverage of the local, national, and international protests that accompanied the World
Trade Organization’s (WTO) Third Ministerial Conference in Seattle, Washington in late
1999. Using the Media Sensitivity-Protest Intensity Model of event reporting, we find that
activist-based web sites report a greater number of transnational protest events at the local,
national, and international level. We also find that activist-based websites are less positively
influenced by the intensity properties of protest events. In the age of globalization, research
on transnational movements should therefore combine conventional media sources and
activist-based web sources.
almeida_lichbach_2003_web.pdf
2002
Los movimientos populares contra las politicas de austeridad económica en América Latina entre 1996 y 2001
Almeida, Paul D. 2002. “Los movimientos populares contra las politicas de austeridad económica en América Latina entre 1996 y 2001”. Realidad: Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades (86):177–189. Publisher's Version
almeida_2002_realidad.pdf
1998
Political opportunities and local grassroots environmental movements
Almeida, Paul, and Linda Brewster Stearns. 1998. “Political opportunities and local grassroots environmental movements”. Social Problems 45 (1):37–60. Publisher's Version Abstract
This paper examines the Minamata mercury victims' grassroots movement. Our analysis demonstrates the value of using a political opportunity framework to understand local grassroot environmental movement (LGEM) outcomes. We explain the variation over time in a LGEM's ability to achieve successful outcomes across different political environments. Specifically, we show that the success of the Minamata LGEM hinged on its ability to employ nontraditional and institutionally disruptive tactics during a period of expanded political opportunities.
almeida_stearns_1998.pdf

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